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Missionary Ancestors | The Global Today

*Replace: 28 Oct 2022… 

Effectively, I did it once more. I went down the mistaken rabbit gap. I’ve two youngsters of the identical identify in a household and I mistakenly thought the primary had died. There was a Jessie born 1867, a Jessie died 1891, and a Jessie born 1891. It was really the Jessie born 1891 that additionally died 1891. The Jessie born in 1867 grew to become a well-traveled and married girl, the explanation why I could not discover both Jessie  in England after 1891. I found this was the Jessie by way of one other member tree at Ancestry. Doing my very own analysis, her dying document had the names of each her dad and mom, so I knew it was my Jessie. 

Jessie Tait was the sister of my nice grandfather. Jessie grew to become a missionary scholar at Doric Faculty (aka Doric Lodge) in Bromley-by-Bow, London, located behind Harley Faculty (for males). On the 1891 census these ladies attended the school together with her:

Eliza Tebutt, 27,
Rothwell

Mary Millard, 26,
Clay Cross

Prudence
Wellwood, 23, Eire

Maggie Waugh, 31,
Coatbridge, Scotland

Emma Whelpdale,
23, Charlton, Kent

Ada Walson, 26,
Hornsey, London

Gertie Van
DeMolen, 29, Holland

Sarah Ann Cheam,
25, Colchester

Amy Pike, 23,
Kensington, London

Mary Smith, 20,
Clapton, London

Jesse Tait, 24,
Liverpool

Maggie Emslie,
22, Scotland

Epiline Arrestad,
32, Norway

Carrie Bishop,
24, London

Florence Wacker,
26, Leeds

Madame Brogniez,
28 France

In 1892 Jessie Tait was one among 5 ladies accepted as a member of the North Africa Mission

Then later it was famous that Jessie’s mission journey was delayed because of lack of funds.

  

These are a number of the ladies that had been accepted in Feb 1892, two of them from Doric Lodge (aka Doric faculty)

The e book additionally tells how a lot cash was wanted to outfit and pay passage for the missionaries going to Africa. 

Jessie was quickly despatched to Algiers the place she was in service to the Mohammedan ladies. 

In 1893 Jessie married William George Pope, a missionary in Algiers since Feb 1891. Their marriage was registered within the British Consular marriages. William had attended Harley Faculty in Bromley-by-Bow the place he was a missionary and linguistics scholar. William grew to become proficient in French, Arabic and Italian. 


This can be a picture of the Missionaries in Algiers on the time.

Names of these within the picture:

Dr C.S. Leach, Mr Cuendet, Mr E.H. Glenny, Mr W.G. Pope, Mr A.S. Lamb

Miss Thomas, Miss Learn, Miss Stewart, Miss Freeman, Miss Trotter, Miss Grey

Mrs Leach, Miss Day, Miss Younger, Mrs Lambert, Miss Okay. Smith, Miss Cox, Mrs Cuendet

Miss Shelbourne, Miss E. Smith

It’s too dangerous there doesn’t appear to be any extra problems with  North Africa: The Month-to-month Document of the North Africa Mission, as Jessie would certainly be talked about within the subsequent few points, as would maybe their marriage and start of youngsters.

*UPDATE: The month-to-month Document of the North African Mission have now been all uploaded on-line totally free. See hyperlink beneath, 1890-1969.

The couple had a toddler born in Algiers, Algeria, the following youngster born in Scotland, the third youngster born in Susa, Tunisia, then the final two born in Liverpool. The Pope household arrived again in Liverpool in 1901 when William took a submit as secretary for the Areas Past Missionary Union, and gave many talks about his time in Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco. 

In 1906 William was known as to be the pastor for the Toxteth Tabernacle in Liverpool. They stayed right here till 1914, when the household immigrated to Australia, the place they lived in Melbourne, Brisbane, then again to Melbourne. 

Jessie died on the age of 60 in 1927 at Ivanhoe, Melbourne, Australia. William retired from the pastorate on the age of 69 in 1936.

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